Blade Crafting aka Blade Knapping

Primitive Blade Knapping is an essential skill for any aspiring wilderness dweller as well as a fantastic hobby for anyone.
When a person’s Swiss Army Knife is falling down a steep mountainside, they will undoubtedly want to know how to craft a new knife to help them get back down the mountain.
Not only that- this is just a good skill to know.  Primitive blade knapping is an art which all our ancestors were familiar with. It is a skill which requires one to learn an acute comprehension of trajectory & physics, & a ‘game’ that rewards the knapper with a valuable skill & piece of art.
To the right are blades crafted by knapping teacher, Gary Pickett.
Top: Asphaltium for great (non-animal based) glue  Center: Morzkite (Missouri state rock)  Right: Knife River (N. and S. Dakotas) Flint. Very very strong.  Bottom: Alabates (from Texas) is cut in a turkey tail style cut that  was found in Ohio River Valley assumed to be used for cutting  plant matter rather than used on animals due to the fact that it would break if cutting an animal but is ideal for plants.
Flint is sharper than steel, doesn’t de-ionize food, and with a
piece of steel makes fire without having to depend on a lighter.
Left: Buffalo River flint from Tennessee. Asphaltium (wild tar)
was used to put it in the antler. The antler point is also used to
pressure flake, so this knife will actually make more blades if
one finds workable material (quartzite, flint, obsidian, jasper,
chert, chelcedony, slate, or petrified wood).
Top: Asphaltium for great (non-animal based) glue
Center: Morzkite (Missouri state rock)
Right: Knife River (N. and S. Dakotas) Flint. Very very strong.
Bottom: Alabates (from Texas) is cut in a turkey tail style cut that
was found in Ohio River Valley assumed to be used for cutting
plant matter rather than used on animals due to the fact that it
would break if cutting an animal but is ideal for plants.
   Wild Willpower looks forward to filming Richard Lonewolf AND many other teachers & helping them teach everyone firsthand via this site for free- including Positive-Impact Harvesting Techniques so no one ruins the ecosystem or damages their population when harvesting-AND to ensure its continued growth!  We’re currently fundraising $ 450,000 to acquire our list of needed resources so we can make this website operate as described here.  We are in immediate need of a vehicle to finish documenting his new bookas well!  Even a small amount helps a great deal!

Database Entry: Distance Everheart 7-27-13

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